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An American Family History

Benjamin Dwinnell 1726

 

"[L]iberty must at all hazards be supported.
We have a right to it, derived from our Maker.
But if we had not, our fathers have earned and bought it for us,
at the expense of their ease, their estates, their pleasure, and their blood."

-- John Adams, 1765

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The New England Meetinghouse was the only municipal building in a town. Both worship and civil meetings were held there. It was customary for men and women to sit separately and the town chose a committee once a year to assign seats according to what was paid, age, and dignity.
New Hampshire was first settled by Europeans in 1623. It was separated from Massachusetts in 1679.
A militia is a military unit composed of citizens who are called up in time of need.

Benjamin Dwinnell was born on November 10, 1726 in Boxford, Essex County, Massachusetts. He was the son of Michael Dwinnell and Elizabeth Fiske. He was a yeoman.

He married Mary Estey in 1750 when he was 24 years old. Their children and life together are described in detail in the section on Benjamin and Mary Dwinnell.

When his father died in 1761 was willed the “house and barn, and my land and meadow in Topsfield."

In 1762 Benjamin Dwinnell was seated in church in

The mens 1st seat in ye west gallery [and] . . . Mr. Benjamin Dwinel’s wife was in the women’s 1st seat in ye east gallery.

Benjamin served in Massachusetts Militia during the Revolutionary War. He was on the muster roll of Captain Jacob Gould's Company in Colonel Samuel Johnson's Regiment of Militia which marched on the alarm April 19, 1775.

He died on July 29, 1805 at the age of 76 years in Keene, New Hampshire. He was buried in the North or Court Street Burial Ground in Keene with his wife, Mary.

Keene, Cheshire County, New Hampshire was settled after 1736 and was a fort protecting Massachusetts during the French and Indian Wars. It was called Upper Ashuelot. When New Hampshire separated from Massachusetts in 1741 it became Keene, New Hampshire. During King George's War, the village was attacked and burned.
Chiildren of Dr. Michael
and Hannah Dwinnell
  • Thomas Dwinnell
  • Sarah Dwinnell Foster
  • Mary Dwinnell Gott Peabody
  • Michael Dwinnell
  • Stephen Dwinnell
  • Hannah Dwinnell Bowery Curtis
  • Jacob Dwinnell
  • Abigail Dwinnell Deering

  • of Dr. Michael and Elizabeth Fiske
  • Benjamin Dwinnell
  • Thomas Dwinnell
  • of Dr. Michael and
    Elizabeth Cave
  • Samuel Dwinnell
  • Elizabeth Dwinnell
  • Children of Benjamin Dwinnell
    and Mary Estey

  • Jonathan Dwinnell
  • Thomas Dwinnell
  • Mary Dwinnell Pomeroy
  • Elizabeth Dwinnell Banks
  • Abigail Dwinnell Francis
  • Hannah Dwinnell Wheeler
  • Benjamin Dwinnell
  • Israel Dwinnell
  • Sarah Dwinnell Colony
  • Esther Dwinnell Metcalf
  • Various spellings of Dwinnell
    Doenell, Donell, Donnall, Donnell, Duenell, Dunnel, Dunnell, Dwaniel, Dwaniell, Dwainel, Dwennel, Dwinel, Dwinell, Dwinnel, Dwinnill, Dwonill, Dwynel

    Mister ( Mr.) was derived from master and Mrs. and Miss were derived from mistress. They indicated people of superior social status in colonial America.

    Boxford, Essex County, Massachusetts is approximately 25 miles north of  Boston. Boxford was set apart from Rowley Village and incorporated in 1685.

     

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    DNA match with other descendant in this line.
    William Warner
    Daniel Warner
    John Warner
    Susannah Warner Fiske
    Elizabeth Fiske Dwinnell
    Benjamin Dwinnell
    Israel Dwinnell
    Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Sr.
    Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Jr.
    Victoria Dwinnell Miller
    Robert Wilson Miller, Sr.
    Robert Wilson Miller, Jr.

     

     

    Bauman & Dreisbach
     
     
     

    ©Roberta Tuller 2016
    tuller.roberta@gmail.com