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An American Family History

Benjamin Dwinnell and Mary Estey

 
Topsfield, Essex County, Massachusetts
Boxford, Essex County, Massachusetts
Keene, Cheshire County,New Hampshire
   

The settlement of New Meadows was incorporated as the Town of Topsfield by authority of the General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1650. The church "gathered" on November 4, 1663 with the Rev. Thomas Gilbert. The third Meeting House was built on the Common in 1703 with Rev. Joseph Capen as pastor.

Various spellings of Dwinnell
Doenell, Donell, Donnall, Donnell, Duenell, Dunnel, Dunnell, Dwaniel, Dwaniell, Dwainel, Dwennel, Dwinel, Dwinell, Dwinnel, Dwinnill, Dwonill, Dwynel

Benjamin Dwinnell married Mary Estey on February 25, 1750 in Topsfield, Essex County, Massachusetts.

In 1770 they moved to Boxford, Essex County, Massachusetts.
Their ten children were all born in Boxford. Jonathan Dwinnell was born on June 14, 1751. Thomas Dwinnell was born in 1752. Mary Dwinnell Pomeroy was born in 1754. Elizabeth Dwinnell Banks was born in 1756. Abigail Dwinnell Francis was born in 1759. Hannah Dwinnell Wheeler was born on October 17, 1761. Benjamin Dwinnell was born in 1763. Israel Dwinnell was born about 1765. Sarah Dwinnell Colony was born in 1770. Esther Dwinnell Metcalf was born in 1772.

Benjamin and at least two of their older sons, Jonathan and Thomas, served in the American Revolution. In 1777 the Benjamin Dwinnell family moved to Keene, New Hampshire, so they were there for the majority of the American Revolution. Their children moved with them.

Hannah married in 1782, Jonathan, Thomas, and Benjamin, Jr. all married in about 1783, Israel and Sarah married in 1787 Esther married in 1791. The Aaron Reverend Hall performed the ceremonies.

Benjamin, Sr. (Benj. Dwinnel) appeared  in the 1800 census of New Hampshire . The household consisted of one man over 45, one girl between ten and fifteen, and one woman over 45.

Benjamin, Sr. died in 1805.

The History of Keene said that 1816 was known as the cold year in Keene and its surrounding towns. For more than twelve weeks during spring and summer, no rain fell.

Mary died in 1820. Jonathan, Thomas, Mary, Elizabeth, Benjamin, Jr., Sarah and Esther stayed in New Hampshire.  Abigail and Israel moved to New York. Hannah moved to Vermont.


Graves of Benjamin & Mary Dwinnell
photo courtesy of Bob Dwinnel

The Association Test
“We, the subscribers do hereby solemnly engage and promise that we will, to the utmost of our powers, at the risque of our lives and fortunes, with arms, oppose the hostile proceedings of the British fleets and Armies against the United American Colonies." 

Keene, Cheshire County, New Hampshire was settled after 1736 and was a fort protecting Massachusetts during the French and Indian Wars. It was called Upper Ashuelot. When New Hampshire separated from Massachusetts in 1741 it became Keene, New Hampshire. During King George's War, the village was attacked and burned.

Three daughters of William Towne and Joanna Blessing were wrongly accused of practicing witchcraft in Salem. Rebecca Towne Nurse, Mary Towne Estey, and Sarah Towne Bridges Cloyes were persecuted in 1692. The children of people in the line below are all descendants of Mary Estey.

William Towne,
Mary Towne Estey,
Isaac Estey,
Aaron Estey
,
Mary Estey Dwinnell
,
Israel Dwinnell,
Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Sr.,
Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Jr.
,
Victoria Zellena Dwinnell
,
Robert Wilson Miller, Sr
.,
Robert Wilson Miller, Jr.

Boxford, Essex County, Massachusetts is approximately 25 miles north of  Boston. Boxford was set apart from Rowley Village and incorporated in 1685.

The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) was between the Kingdom of Great Britain and the 13 colonies which became the newly formed United States.

 

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Bauman & Dreisbach
 
 
 

©Roberta Tuller 2017
tuller.roberta@gmail.com