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An American Family History

Samuel Davis

Middlesex County, Massachusetts was created on May 10, 1643. The county originally included Charlestown, Cambridge, Watertown, Sudbury, Concord, Woburn, Medford, Wayland, and Reading.

Lush forests in Colonial America allowed settlers to build wooden homes.

Samuel Davis was born on August 16, 1694/95 in Groton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. His parents were Samuel and Anna Davis.

Samuel married Sarah Boynton on February 27, 1727/28. The marriage record indicates that they were both from Turkey Hills (Lunenburg). Sarah was born on June 17, 1708. Her parents were Benoni Boynton and Ann Mighill.

Samuel and Sarah settled in Lunenburg, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

Samuel and Sarah's children were born in Lunenburg:
Sarah Davis (1732, died young),
Samuel Davis (1735, married Margaret Downe),
Joseph Davis (1738),
Submit Davis (1741),
Amos Davis (1743) and
Mighil Davis (1745).
Sarah died in 1746.

Samuel died in 1775 in Lunenburg.
mother
First printed in Boston 1745
Old Style Calendar
Before 1752 the year began on Lady Day, March 25th,. Dates between January 1st and March 24th were at the end of the year. Old Style (O.S.) and New Style (N.S.) are used to indicate whether the year has been adjusted. Often both dates are used.
Children of Samuel
and Anna Davis
  • Samuel Davis
  • Anna Davis
  • Mary Davis Foster
  • Barnabas Davis
  • Simon Davis
  • Amos Davis
  • Experience Davis
  • Elizabeth Davis
  • Ebenezer Davis
  • Stephen Davis
  • Groton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts was settled and incorporated in 1655. During King Philip's War, indigenous warriors burned all but four of Groton's garrisons. Survivors fled, but returned two years later to rebuild the town. Groton was again threated during Queen Anne's War.

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a common and often deadly infectious disease. It was called consumption. It usually attacks the lungs and the symptoms are coughing blood, fever, night sweats, and weight loss.

    Estate inventories give us a glance into the home life of Colonial Americans.
     

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