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An American Family History

Thomas Ricketts 1659

  Anne Arundel County, Maryland  
 

Ricketts is also spelled Rickeots, Rickeotts, Rickett, Rickets, Ricket, Rickel, Rickle, Rickels, and Rickles.

 
Anne Arundel County, Maryland was established in 1650.
Maryland was established with religious freedom for Catholics. The colonial economy was based on tobacco cultivated by Africans who had been enslaved.
The first European settlements in Maryland were made in 1634 when English settlers created a permanent colony.

Thomas Ricketts was born about 1659. He was a planter in Anne Arundel County, Maryland.

He was born in England and transported to Maryland by William Burgess before 1677 when William Burgess sold George Holland "eleven rights of land" which he had received for transporting people, including, Thomas Ricketts, to Maryland.

Thomas Ricketts had 55 acres of Hickory Hills on the south side of the South River in Anne Arundel County on January 10, 1667 and a portion of Franklyn's Enlargement which was next to Indian Range on June 9, 1669.

Thomas married Margaret (or Margrit) Evans on 1684 in All Hallows Parish, Anne Arundel, Maryland.

Thomas Ricketts, Jr. was born on September 20, 1685.

On March 8, 1702, Thomas bought 300 acres of Ridgely and Tylor's Chance in Prince George's County from Colonel Henry Ridgely and Robert Tyler.

On February 15, 1703 he bought part of Ryley's Discovery for 134£ from Hugh Ryley. His part was 510 acres in Prince George's County on Back Branch.

Margaret died on March 17, 1704. She was laid to rest at All Hallows Cemetery, (All Hallow's Protestant Episcopal Church Collection, "Parish Register 1669-1721," p. 32(1), Maryland State Archives SC 2458 M 221)

Thomas married Sarah Rawlings on August 14, 1705 at All Hallows Parish, Anne Arundel, Maryland.

On August 14, 1705 Aaron Rawlings witnessed a land transaction between Daniel and Joseph Richardson, planters and Thomas Ricketts, Sr. Other witnesses were R. Duckett and Edward Moriarite. The transaction was for 55 acres called Ricketts’ Addition, which was part of Hickory Hills, next to Clark’s Inheritance.

On February 24, 1706 he mortgaged his 300 acres of Ridgely's and Tyler's Chance for 120£ to Thomas Fowler.

In 1707 he testified that he had seen Richard Clark who was on the run from the law at that time. Richard was Rebecca's first cousin.

On June 19, 1707, Thomas mortaged 200 acres of Ryley's Discovery to Richard Lancaster, merchant of London for 100£. He was to repay it within 3 years.

In 1708 Thomas was named Warden of Queen Anne's Parish, Prince George's County, Maryland.

In 1709 their servant, Eleanor Brown, confessed to having a mixed race son out of wedlock. The son was bound out until he was 31. Again in 1718/19, Eleanor, confessed to having a son out of wedlock. Her sons were bound out until the age of 31 to Henry Meriday. She was required to serve the Ricketts for an additonal 12 months. Her children were listed in the inventory of Thomas' estate.

May 1, 1717 he sold John Pottinger, Sr. 200 acres in Prince George's County including all of Pottinger's and part of Riley's Discovery for 120£. The same day he bought Major's Lot in Prince George's County from Pottinger for 20£.

According to the All Hallows Parish Register, Thomas Rickeots was buried on April 30, 1722 and Sarah Rickeots, a widow, on May 7, 1722.

Prince George's County, Maryland was created in 1696 from portions of Charles, and Calvert Counties. It was divided into six districts called hundreds: Mattapany, Patuxant, Collington, Mount Calvert, Piscattoway, and New Scotland. A part the county became Frederick County in 1748.

 


Colonial Maryland used the headright system to encourage settlement. Land was granted to anyone who would pay fthe transportation costs of a laborer.

 

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All Hallows Church (The Brick Church) records date back to 1682. It was an Anglican church. The building was constructed about 1710. The cemetery surrounds the church.

from Free African Americans of Maryland and Delaware: from the Colonial Period to 1810

Eleanor Brown, born say 1689, the servant of Thomas Ricketts, confessed to the Anne Arundel County Court in November 1709 that she had a child by her master's "Negroe Will." Her son, born October 1709, was bound to Henry Mereday until the age of thirty-one.

In March 1718/9 she confessed to having a child by "Negroe Sam belonging to Col. Mahall." The court ordered her to serve her master, Thomas Ricketts, twelve months for the trouble of his house and bound the child to Henry Merryday until the age of thirty-one. [Judgment Record 1708-12, 98, 201; 1717-9, 307]. [Henry Merriday (Mereday, Merryday) (b. 1690) married Anne Stratton in 1702. He lived at Swan Cove in Anne Arundel, Maryland from 1707 to 1721]

She was the mother of

i. John1, born about 1713, a ten-year-old "Mallato" with twenty-one years to serve when he was valued at 15 pounds in the 31 May 1723 inventory of the Anne Arundel County estate of Thomas Ricketts, deceased [Prerogative Court Inventories and Accounts, Maryland State Archives SM 11, SR 4330-1, 8:196-9].

2        ii. Margaret, born about 1716.

iii. Philemon, born about 1718, about four or five years of age on 31 May 1723 when he was listed in Thomas Ricketts' estate [Prerogative Court Inventories & Accounts 8:196-9].

 2.    Margaret Brown, born about 1716, was a seven-year-old "Mallato" with twenty-four years to serve when she was valued at 11 pounds in the 31 May 1723 inventory of Thomas Ricketts [Prerogative Court Inventories and Accounts, Maryland State Archives SM 11, SR 4330-1, 8:196-9].

Bound children were indentured servants whose master provided training in a craft, board, lodging, and clothes for seven years or until the child came of age.
 
 
     
From 1633 to 1681, Lord Baltimore rewarded people who transported themselves or others to Maryland with 50 acres per person transported.
American colonists continued to use British monetary units, namely the pound, shilling and pence for which £1 (or li) equalled 20s and 1s equalled 12d. In 1792 the dollar was established as the basic unit of currency.

Maryland Land Office, Patent book, Vol. 15, p. 431
August 31st 1677 came John Jefferson of Dorchester County and obtained his right to fifty acres of land for his time of service performed in this province. 

Know all men by these presents that I John Jefferson of Dorchester county due assign unto Andrew Insley of the same county all my rights, title and interest of in and to fifty acres of land right due to me for my time of service performed in the province of Maryland to have and to hold the same to him the said Andrew and his heirs and assignes forever.

With my hand and seal.
August 31st 1677  (?)
John Bloomfield  
John A. Jefferson (seal)

Warrant then granted to Andrew Insley for one hundred acres of land due by the above assignment from
John Jefferson V
Arthur Hart
John Morgan,
John Boyin,
Rich Griffeth,
Thom. Ricketts,
Chas Willis,
Alice Green,
Willi Hewes,
Sam. Gray,
Sam Warde,
John Stinson,
Francis Martin
Sept 21st 1677.

The above named eleven were then proved [verified] by the oath of Coll. [Colonel] William Burges
before me William Calvert
Know all men by these presents that
I William Burges of Ann Arundell County do hereby assign, sell and sell over unto George Holland eleven rights to land due me for transporting
John Morgan,
John Burgess,
Richard Griffeth,
Thomas Ricketts,
Charles Willis,
Alice Green,
William Hewes,
Samuel Grey,
Samuel Wards,
John Stinson and
Francis Martin

into the province to inhabit, to have and to hold the same (?) the said George Holland his heirs and aforsigned forever (?) hand 21st September 1677 (?)   

William Burges (?) warrant those granted to George Holland for five hundred fifty acres of land due by the above aforsigned from William Burges
Oct 22nd 1677.  

 

Seals were used to authenticate documents and men were expected to have a personal die. Records in deed books are copies and signatures are usually in the clerk’s handwriting. The clerk drew a circle around the word “seal” to indicate that the original document was sealed.

Lord Baltimore, Cecil Calvert (1605 -1675), 2nd Baron Baltimore was the first governor of Maryland.
Phillip Calvert (1626–1682), was the 5th governor from 1660 to1665.
Charles Calvert (1637 – 1715), 3rd Baron Baltimore inherited the colony in 1675.
 
 
 

Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland 1702-1709, p. 9:
March Court: folio 48,
Indenture 8 Mar 1702.
From: Coll. Henry Ridgley, merchant, and Robert Tyler, Gent., both of Prince George's County.
To: Thomas Ricketts, planter of Anne Arundel County. For 120 pounds a tract of land containing 300 acres, being part of Ridley [Ridgely] and Taylor's Chance lying in Prince George's County; bounded by Willson's Plaine now in the possession of Mareen Duvall, Jr., a tract laid out for Lewis Duvall which also is part of the land called Ridgley [Ridgely] and Taylor's Chance (the whole containing 463 acres);
also bounding Thomas Fowler's land;
Royal mines excepted.
Signed: Henry Ridgley [Ridgely] (mark) and Robert Tyler.

Memorandum: On the back of the deed the endorsement of Mary Ridgley and Susannah Tyler examined by Sam'll Magruder and Tho. Sprigg, Junior.
Witnessed: Samuell Magruder and Rich'd Duckett.
Alienation: 23-Mar-1702 received of Thomas Ricketts the sum of 12s.

 
 
 
 

Prince George's County Land Records, Folio 76: Indenture, 15 Feb 1703
From: Hugh Ryley of Prince George's County
To: Edward Dawson of Prince George's County
For 134£ a 510 acre tract of land called Ryley's Discovery (now called Ware Park) lying in Prince George's County; bounded by Back Branch and Ryley's Discovery
Signed: Hugh Ryley
Now called Ware Park between the 10th & 11th line, interlined before & signed in presence of us Richard Duckett and Thomas Ricketts
Memorandum: 15 Feb 1703 Hugh Ryley and his wife Mary acknowledged deed
Signed: John Wight and Thomas Sprigg, Jr.
Alienation: 15 Feb 1703 the sum of 8s/5p paid by Edward Davison

 
 
 
 

Prince George's County Land Records, Folio 77: Indenture, 15 Feb 1703
From: Hugh Ryley, carpenter of Prince George's County
To: Thomas Ricketts of Anne Arundel County
For 266£ a 380 acre tract of land being part of the 1,000 acres of Ryley's Discovery; bounded by the plantation of Matthew Mackebey and land laid out for Major Nicholas Sewell and John Darnall, Esq'r; by Moor's Lott and Back Branch
Signed: Hugh Ryley
Endorsed: Richard Duckett and Edward Dawson
Memorandum: Endorsed 15 Feb 1703; Mary Ryley examined by Jno. Wight and Tho's Sprigg, Jr.
Alienation: 15 Feb 1703 the sum of 15s 3p paid by Thomas Ricketts

 
 
 
 

Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland 1702-1709, p. 52:
February Court 1706: folio 183a,
Indenture 24 Feb 1706.
From: Thomas Ricketts, planter of Anne Arundel County.
To: Thomas Fowler, planter of Prince George's County.
For 120 pounds a 300 acre tract of 463 acres called Ridgly's [Ridgely] and Tyler's Chance in Prince George's County; bounded by Willson's Plaines in possession of Mareen Devall, Jr., it being the NW corner of land laid out for Lewis Devall also part of Ridgly's and Tyler's Chance.
Signed: Thomas Ricketts.
Memorandum: 20 Feb 1706 Sarah Ricketts examined by Rob't Tyler and J. Gerard. Vide ye alienation folio 203.

 
 
 
 

Land Records, Folio 193: Indenture, 19 Jun 1707
From: Thomas Ricketts, Senior, of Anne Arundel County
To: Richard Lancaster, merchant of London in the Kingdom of England
For 100£ a 200 acre tract of land known as Ryley's Discovery from a tract laid out for Ricketts for 360 acres sold to him by Hugh Ryley of Prince George's County;
lying in the freshes near the Patuxent River; upon condition that Ricketts cannot or does not pay the factors of Lancaster 100£ within 3 years of the date of indenture
Signed: Thomas Ricketts
Witnessed: John Beckett (mark) and Easter Abraham (mark)

 
 
 
 
 
 

Aprill 9th 1707
Mr Thomas Ricketts being brought by the Sherriff of Ann Arundell County before his Exncy the Governour and Councill Declared Mrs Elizabeth Clarke told him Mr Hill had sent a Sloope for her which was Consigned to him Says he thinks and verily believes he has seen Richd Clarke twice the last winter near his late dwelling Plantation at the head of South River. Says Some time the last winter he Saw Silvester Welch Sitting with Mrs Clark at Clarks House and Suspects Richard Clarke might be then in the Same house the Doors were Shut when he came to the house
Sworne in Councill
W Bladen Cl Concil

 
 
 
 

Abstracts of Land Records of Anne Arundel County, Maryland:

Warrant for resurvey of Beard's Habitation, bordered by W. Puddington, granted to Mo(r)dicai Moore, Anne Arundel, Gent., as guardian of his son Richard, 17 Mar. 1704,

resurvey by Thos. Larkin, surveyor, completed 6 S 1705;
examined by Jno. Gresham, Jr.
Jurors Chas. Tulle, Edwd. Mariarte, Robt. Brown, Wm. Mitchell, Francis Pairpoint, Wm. Jiams; Edward Carter, Wm. Brewer, Tho. Rickeotts, Jos. Jones, Robt. Ward

 
 
 
 

Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland 1710-1717, p. 63: folio 626,
Indenture 1 May 1717.
From: Thomas Ricketts, Sr., planter of Anne Arundel County.
To: John Pottinger, Sr., planter of Prince George's County.

For 120 pounds all that parcel of land called Pottinger's in Prince George's county part of a tract called Riley's Discovery sold by Ryler to Pottinger; on the east side of a tract formerly laid out for Majr Nicholas Sewell and John Darnall; containing 200 acres of land.
Signed: Thomas Ricketts (seal).
Witnessed: Robt. Tyler, Thos. Clagett, Jos. Belt.
Memo: Sarah Ricketts acknowledged deed

 
 
 
     
 

Land Records of Prince George's County, Maryland 1710-1717, p. 63, folio 630,
Indenture 1 May 1717.
From: John Pottinger, Sr., planter of Prince George's county.
To: Thomas Ricketts, Sr., planter of Anne Arundel County. For 20 pounds a parcel of land called Major's Lot in Prince George's County.
Witnessed: Robt. Tyler, Tho. Clagett.
Memo: John Pottinger and Mary Pottinger his wife acknowledged deed before above witnesses.