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An American Family History

Hannah Richards Stocker

Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts was first settled by English Puritans in 1629 and was first incorporated in 1631 as Saugus.

Some Puritans gave their children hortatory names (from the Latin for “encourage”) like Thankful, hoping that the children would live up to them. The names were used for several generations.

Hannah Richards Stocker was born in 1717 in Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Crispus Richards and Sarah Collins.

She married John Stocker on March 30, 1738. John Stocker was born on February 15, 1713 in Lynn and was the son of Samuel Stocker and Hannah Lewis.

They had one daughter, Thankful Stocker, who was born in March 1739/40 in Lynn.

Hannah died on March 5, 1739/40 when she was about 23 years old. She probably died of complications of childbirth. She is buried in the Old Burying Ground, Lynn.

Here lyes ye body of
Mrs Hannah
ye wife of
Mr John Stocker
who died
March ye 5th
1740
in her ?? year

After she died, John married Ruth Breed who was born on September 30, 1721. Ruth was the daughter of Joseph Breed and Susannah Newhall.

John died on August 7, 1810.

Old Style Calendar
Before 1752 the year began on Lady Day, March 25th,. Dates between January 1st and March 24th were at the end of the year. Old Style (O.S.) and New Style (N.S.) are used to indicate whether the year has been adjusted. Often both dates are used.
Children of Sarah Collins
and Joseph Eliot
  • Mercy Eliot Alton

  • Children of Crispus Richards
    and Sarah Collins
  • Joseph Richards
  • Esther Richards Estey
  • John Richards
  • Mary Richards
  • Crispus Richards
  • Sarah Richards Ingalls
  • Hannah Richards Stocker
  • Richard Richards
  • ye is an archaic spelling of "the."
    Childbirth was was perilous. Around 1.5 percent of births ended in the mother's death. Since women gave birth to many children, chances of dying in childbirth were quite high.
     

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    English colonists from Salem were the first settlers in Lynn.

    Lush forests in Colonial America allowed settlers to build wooden homes.

    from Genealogical and Personal Memoirs, Volume 3 by William Richard Cutter

    (II) Samuel Stocker, son of Ebenezer and Sarah (Marshall) Stocker, was born in Lynn. November 29, 1684. He married, November 13, 1711. Hannah Lewis, born January 22. 1685-86, daughter of John, Jr. and Elizabeth (Brewer) Lewis, granddaughter of John and Hannah Lewis, and great-granddaughter of William and Amy Lewis, of Lynn.

    Samuel and Hannah (Lewis) Stocker had three children:
    1. John, February 15, 1713.
    2. Joseph, twin, July 28, 1717.
    3. Samuel, twin, July 28. 1717.
    and possibly others whose names do not appear in the records.

    (III) John Stocker. son of Samuel and Hannah (Lewis) Stocker, was born in Lynn, February 15, 1713: married March 17, 174243, Ruth Breed, born September 31, 1721. daughter of Joseph and Susannah (Newhall) Breed, of Lynn.

    They had eight children, all born in Lynn:
    1. Susannah, September 1, 1744.
    2. John, September 7, 1746.
    3. Ebenezer, February 9, 1749.
    4. Marchal (Marshall), March 27. 1751.
    5. Martha. January 11, 1753.
    6. Ephraim, January 7, 1756.
    7. Jane, May 14. 1758.
    8. Daniel, February 7. 1761.

    Boston
    1756
    Cutter's work is available on CD
    Essex County, Massachusetts was created on May 10, 1643 by the General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, when it ordered "that the whole plantation within this jurisdiction be divided into four sheires."

     

    Bauman & Dreisbach
     
     
     

    ©Roberta Tuller 2017
    tuller.roberta@gmail.com