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An American Family History

Isaac Davis Dwinnel

Keene, Cheshire County, New Hampshire was settled after 1736 and was a fort protecting Massachusetts during the French and Indian Wars. It was called Upper Ashuelot. When New Hampshire separated from Massachusetts in 1741 it became Keene, New Hampshire. During King George's War, the village was attacked and burned.
New Hampshire was first settled by Europeans in 1623. It was separated from Massachusetts in 1679.
New Hampshire was first settled by Europeans in 1623. It was separated from Massachusetts in 1679.

Isaac Davis Dwinnel, Sr. was born on July 14, 1794 in Keene, Cheshire County, New Hampshire. His parents were Israel Dwinnell and Eunice Davis. He was named for his mother’s father, Isaac Davis. He worked as a laborer. 

On July 31, 1814, Isaac D. Dwinnell enlisted in Colonel Robert Bogardus's Regiment of the U.S. 41th Infantry. He was enlisted by Lieutenant Bakman for the period of the war. He was a tailor born in New Hampshire and 5’5" tall. He had grey eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion.

His record indicated that he was from New York and on August 1, 1814, he was with the party at Hudson. 

Colonel Bogardus' orders for August 5, 1814 indicated that he should supply the Decatur Blockhouse at Rockaway Point. The Blockhouse guarded New York Harbor during the War of 1812.

Coln. Bogardus will take under his immediate orders the Garrison of the Block House at Rockaway. He will see that it is regularly supplied with provisions and all other requisites, relieve the garrison as often as he finds convenient and sign all other requisitions for its use. An awning, officers tent and spy glass will be necessary. He will establish signals between it and the Hdqrs of his Regt and support a communication with it by interior navigation through Coney Island Inlet.

Colonel Robert Bogardus led the 41st Regiment U.S. Infantry which was organized in 1813. It was composed of eight Companies, and was stationed at New Utrecht, Brooklyn in 1814.

Captain Quackenbos’s Company book for 1814-1815 indicated that Isaac deserted on October 14, 1814. Mangle Minthorne Quackenbos served throughout the War of 1812. He was appointed Captain on January 7, 1814. He transferred to the 8th Infantry on May 17, 1815.

He probably married before 1816 when he was about 22 years old. Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Jr. was probably born in 1816 in Manilus, Onondaga County, New York.

He (Davis Dwinnell) was arrested for grand larceny and convicted in Onondaga County, New York on November 27, 1818 for a term of five years. The records on file at the County Clerk’s office in Delhi, Delaware County, New York show he had a light complexion and was five feet and seven inches tall. He was pardoned in 1819 when he was 24 years old. He was released on October 24, 1819 with time remaining in his sentence of four years, one month and three days. (New York State Prison Pardons 1819 by Linda Ogborn)

The 1820 census recorded that the Davis Dwinnell family were in Aurelius, Cayuga County, New York.

The household consisted of

one man between 27 & 45 (Isaac age 26)
one woman between 16 & 26.(Mrs. D.)
three boys under ten (Isaac, Jr. was about 4),

On August 23, 1820 (part 2 of record) Isaac D. Dwinnell from Keene enlisted again. He was 30 [?] years old and 5" 7'. He had grey eyes and brown hair and was a laborer.

He deserted October 10, 1824.

In 1830 Isaac D. Dwinnell was in Salina, Onondaga County, New York. 

Three daughters of William Towne and Joanna Blessing were wrongly accused of practicing witchcraft in Salem. Rebecca Towne Nurse, Mary Towne Estey, and Sarah Towne Bridges Cloyes were persecuted in 1692. The children of people in the line below are all descendants of Mary Estey.

William Towne,
Mary Towne Estey,
Isaac Estey,
Aaron Estey
,
Mary Estey Dwinnell
,
Israel Dwinnell,
Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Sr.,
Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Jr.
,
Victoria Zellena Dwinnell
,
Robert Wilson Miller, Sr
.,
Robert Wilson Miller, Jr.

 

In the War of 1812 (1812-1815) the United States declared war on England because of trade restrictions, impressment, and British support for Indian attacks. They signed the Treaty of Ghent on December 24, 1814 after reaching a stalemate.

A blockhouse or garrison house is a small, isolated fort. The typical blockhouse was two stories with the second story overhanging the first. It had small openings to allow residents to shoot attackers without being exposed.
 

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DNA match with other descendant in this line.
Henry Collins
Joseph Collins
Sarah Collins Richards
Esther Richards Estey
Mary Estey Dwinnell
Israel Dwinnell
Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Sr.
Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Jr.
Victoria Dwinnell Miller
Robert Wilson Miller, Sr.
Robert Wilson Miller, Jr.

DNA match with other descendant in this line.
Richard Kimball
John Kimball
Abigail Kimball Estey
Aaron Estey
Mary Estey Dwinnell
Israel Dwinnell
Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Sr.
Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Jr.
Victoria Dwinnell Miller
Robert Wilson Miller, Sr.
Robert Wilson Miller, Jr.

DNA match with other descendant in this line.
William Warner
Daniel Warner
John Warner
Susannah Warner Fiske
Elizabeth Fiske Dwinnell
Benjamin Dwinnell
Israel Dwinnell
Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Sr.
Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Jr.
Victoria Dwinnell Miller
Robert Wilson Miller, Sr.
Robert Wilson Miller, Jr.

DNA match with other descendant in this line.
Walter Powers
Thomas Powers
Jeremiah Powers
Elizabeth Powers Davis
Eunice Davis Dwinnell
Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Sr.
Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Jr.
Victoria Dwinnell Miller
Robert Wilson Miller, Sr.
Robert Wilson Miller, Jr.

DNA match with other descendant in this line.
Samuel Davis
Simon Davis
Captain Isaac Davis
Eunice Davis Dwinnell
Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Sr.
Isaac Davis Dwinnell, Jr.
Victoria Dwinnell Miller
Robert Wilson Miller, Sr.
Robert Wilson Miller, Jr.

 

 

Bauman & Dreisbach
 
 
 

©Roberta Tuller 2017
tuller.roberta@gmail.com