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An American Family History

Abigail Brewer Luscomb

Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts was first settled by English Puritans in 1629 and was first incorporated in 1631 as Saugus.

Abigail Brewer Luscomb was born on December 4, 1664 in Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Crispus and Mary Brewer.

About 1691 she married John Luscomb (Liscom, Liscomb, Liscum, Lyscom, Lyscomb) who was the son of William and Susannah Luscomb. He was born about 1668.

Her father left her all his real and personal estate in his will. He died in 1706. Abigail and John had at least one son, Samuel Luscomb was born in Lynn on September 16, 1693.

On February 10, 1706/07, she was a widow and sold Crispus Richards eight acres of her father's land.

John died in 1707 in Southborough, Worcester County. After his death, Abigail sold her nephew, Crispus Richards, the land that she had inherited from her father.

Abigail died on August 16, 1737.

Children of Mary and
Crispus Brewer, Sr.
  • Crispus Brewer, Jr.
  • Sarah Brewer Graves
  • Mary Brewer Richards
  • Thomas Brewer
  • Elizabeth Brewer Lewis
  • Abigail Brewer Luscomb
  • It was common for bequests to include wearing apparel.
     

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    The Driver Family is available.

    Lush forests in Colonial America allowed settlers to build wooden homes.

    The Driver Family: A Genealogical Memoir by Harriet Ruth Waters Cooke

    William Luscomb the first of the name in Salem, Mass., was a cooper, and appears on the county deeds, Dec. 4,1680, when he bought of Mark Haskell, of Beverly, Mass., for £27,

    a row of houses in which John Blygh now liveth next ye Meeting house, . . . the land formerly pertaining to Abigail Lord.

    This estate was settled by instalments (sic), the last being paid Feb. 1. 1686, by his wife Susannah, during her husband's absence in England.There is no date of his death, or settlement of his estate. He married Susannah .

    The following children constituted at least a part of his family:
    2. John Luscom, born about 1668.
    3. William Luscomb born about 1675; died in 1733-4.
    4. Joanna Luscomb bapt. at adult age, Jan 16, 1686-7.

    John Luscomb son of William and Susannah Luscomb, born about 1668 died before 1707; md. about 1691, Abigail Brewer, dau. of Crispus and Mary Brewer, of Lynn, Mass.; she born Dec. 4, 1664. Dec. 10, 1706, her father gave her all his real and personal estate, he dying Dec. 11, 1706, and his wife Mary dying May 3, 1692.

    Feb. 10, 1706-7, she (Abigail) was a widow, when she sold to Crispus Richards 8 acres of her father's land, which he bought of Ebenezer Witter.

    Child was (probably others, not found):
    Samuel Luscomb, born in Lynn, Mass., Sept. 16, 1693.

     

    Samuel Luscomb son of John (William), and Abigail (Brewer) Luscomb, born in Lynn, Mass., Sept. 16, 1693; made his will April 6, 1751; proved Jan. 2, 1751-2; names wife Mary, sons Thomas and Samuel, and daughter Elizabeth Abbott.

    He was at first a shipwright, afterwards a gunsmith; md. first, Jan. 20, 1715-16, Elizabeth, probably daughter of William Beal, of Marblehead, Mass.; she, with six others, baptized May 24, 1696.
    He married, second, April 17, 1746, Mary Stacy.
    Children by Elizabeth were : —
    13. William Luscomb, born Nov. 1, 1716; died before 1751.
    14. Elizabeth Luscomb, born Aug. 10, 1718; md. Oct. 19, 1740, Benjamin Abbott.
    15. Martha Luscomb, born Aug. 9, 1720; died before 1751; md. Oct. 19, 1740, Benjamin Tyler.
    16. Samuel Luscomb, born Aug. 9, 1722; died in 1781.
    17. Thomas Luscomb, born March 21,1724-5 ; md. May 19, 1747, Miriam

    Old Style Calendar
    Before 1752 the year began on Lady Day, March 25th,. Dates between January 1st and March 24th were at the end of the year. Old Style (O.S.) and New Style (N.S.) are used to indicate whether the year has been adjusted. Often both dates are used.
    Essex County, Massachusetts was created on May 10, 1643 by the General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, when it ordered "that the whole plantation within this jurisdiction be divided into four sheires."
    Estate inventories give us a glance into the home life of Colonial Americans.
         

     

    Bauman & Dreisbach
     
     
     

    ©Roberta Tuller 2017
    tuller.roberta@gmail.com