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An American Family History

 

Jacob and Magdalene Baker

 
   
 
George Washington
 

In 1831 Page County, Virginia was created from Rockingham and Shenandoah Counties. Originally it was part of Frederick County.

In the War of 1812 (1812-1815) the United States declared war on England because of trade restrictions, impressment, and British support for Indian attacks. They signed the Treaty of Ghent on December 24, 1814 after reaching a stalemate.

Buildings in Clark County, Ohio ranged from simple log cabins to sophisticated Italianate and Gothic Revival structures.

Jacob Baker and Magdalene Kibler were married before 1776 in Virginia. Their children were all born in what is currently Page County, Virginia. No doubt the turmoil of the American Revolution affected the family. Jacob was a private in American army.

Philip Baker was born in 1776,
Samuel Baker was born on  January 26, 1787,
Jacob Baker was born about 1789,
Martin Baker was born on August 13, 1793. 
Henry Baker was born on April 2, 1795,
Magdaline Baker Xander was born on June 23, 1797, and
John Baker was born about 1800.

Jacob and Magdalene had two other daughters, since he mentioned three daughters in his will. The names of the other daughters are not known.

On September 8, 1804 Jacob, as heir of Phillip Baker, sold the land in Shenandoah (now Page) County, Virginia to Pierson Judd. (Deed Book N, p. 527-528).

The entire family, including some of Jacob’s brothers and sisters and his son Philip's family and parents-in law, moved to German Township in Clark County, Ohio. The move was described in Philip’s daughter, Mary Rockel’s, obituary. It also described the county at the time of their move. 

At that time Springfield was but a struggling hamlet with half a dozen houses on the now beautiful Mad River. It was the vast wilderness of woods, brush and water. The pioneer's cabin was sometimes not to be seen for miles. Indians were a not uncommon sight, and wild animals of all kinds were roaming through the woods. (Springfield Republic, October 3, 1886)

John, Philip and Samuel Baker were soldiers in the War of 1812.

On September 10, 1817, Jacob purchased 320 acres of the South ½ Section 8, Township 4, Range 10 adjoining the Mad River for $3,850. Jacob Baker appeared on the 1818 Tax Roll for Clark County. The 1820 census listed Jacob Baker in German Township.

The family helped organize and worshiped at Mt. Pisgah Church in Lawrenceville.

Philip married in Virginia before the family moved to Ohio, but moved with the family. Samuel married in 1815. 

Jacob died in 1821 and Magdalene followed in 1830. Jacob’s will (Clark County, Ohio Will Book A, p. 59) divided his land between five of his six sons. At the time of his death, Henry and Martin already had their own places on the family’s land. Philip received $300.00. The three girls received the profits from the sale of his moveable property.

Jacob and Magdalene are buried in Lawrenceville cemetery with many family members.

Philip died in 1828 and his widow eventually moved to Ohio with her children. Samuel, Jacob, Martin, Magdalene Xander and John and their families remained in German Township.

Lawrenceville Cemetery is in thevillage of Lawrenceville, German Township, Clark County, Ohio.

cemetery

The Public Land Survey System is used to survey and spatially identify land parcels in the United States.
  • Range is the distance east or west from a referenced principal meridian in units of six miles.
  • A Section is approximately a one-square-mile block of land. There are 36 sections in a township.
  • A Township is a parcel of land of 36 square miles or a measure of the distance north or south from a referenced baseline in units of six miles.
  • American pioneers migrated west to settle areas not previously inhabited by European Americans.

    John Adams, Jr. (1735-1826) was the second President of the United States (17971801), the first Vice President (17891797).

    The United States Constitution is the supreme law of the United States of America and was ratified in 1789.

     

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    ©Roberta Tuller 2017
    tuller.roberta@gmail.com