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An American Family History

Richard Carr

     

Washington County, Tennessee,was established in 1777 as Washington County, North Carolina. From 1784 to 1788,it was part of the State of Franklin.

Richard Carr was born on July 31, 1781 in South Carolina. He was the son of John Carr and Louvisa Isbell.

He married Martha York on June 2, 1803 in Washington County, Tennessee.

Richard and Martha's children included:

Susan Carr (1804),
Elizabeth Carr (1806, married Henry Kitzmiller),
Alfred Carr (1808, married Elizabeth King),
James M. Carr (1809),
Mahala Alice Carr (1811, married Joseph Bowman, son of Jacob Bowman),
Louisa Carr (1813), and
Richard Carr (1815).

About 1824, several members were excommunicated from the Sinking Creek Baptist Church. The church split over who was to baptize Fanny Renfro. The excommunicated included Edward Hendry, Richard Carr, Joseph Renfro, David Pugh, Molly Hendrix (Hendricks) and Eli McNabb. They went to Boones Creek Baptist Church.

In 1832 Richard and his sons, Alfred and James, witnessed William King's will.

At the time of the 1830 census they were in Washington County, Tennessee. The household conisted of:

A man and a woman between 40 & 49
Two men between 20 & 29
A girl between 15 & 19
A boy between 10 & 14
An enslaved male and female between 10 & 23
An enslaved girl under 10


Richard died in 1843 in Washington County, Tennessee.

East Tennessee is part of Appalachia. At the end of the French and Indian War, colonists began drifting into the area. In 1769, they first settled along the Watauga River. During the Revolution, the Overmountain Men defeated British loyalists at the Battle of Kings Mountain. The State of Franklin was formed in the 1780s, but never admitted to the Union.
     
 

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from The Jonesborough Whig, and Independent Journal, November 8, 1843
transcribed by, Amanda Jowers

Departed this life, at his residence in this county, on Saturday night, the 29th ult. after a short but painful illness, Richard Carr Esq., in the 61st year of his age [note, actual age was 60].

The deceased has left behind a widow and seven children to lament their irreparable loss - the loss to them, of one, whose death was as sudden as it was unexpected and afflicting.

The deceased was a kind husband, an indulgent parent, and an obliging neighbor. He was truly endowed with a most agreable disposition, excellent sense, sound principles and a benevolent turn of mind - and, above all Christian piety and meekness, in the possesion of which he died; He had been for 30 years a member of the Baptist Church, and died as he had lived, a pious and happy man. He told his friends around his bed side not to mourn after him, that he was going from the evils of this life, to the joys of paradise. He was born and raised in this county, and his worth is known to our citizens. Peace to the ashes of so good a man!

 

 
 
 
 

from The Jonesborough Whig, and Independent Journal, November 01, 1843
transcribed by, Amanda Jowers

Richard Carr, Esq. - Died, At his residence in this county, on Saturday night, the 29th ult., after a short but painful illness, Richard Carr, Esq., in the 60th year of his age. Mr. Carr was an estimable citizen, and his death is much regretted. He was a kind husband, an indulgent parent, and an obliging neighbor. Withal he was a worthy member of the Baptist Church, and has gone from the evils of this life to a better.

 
 
 
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©Roberta Tuller 2020
tuller.roberta@gmail.com
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