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An American Family History

 

The George Green Family

Baltimore County, Maryland was founded in 1659 and included most of northeastern Maryland. The original county included parts of Cecil, Frederick, Harford, Carroll, and Baltimore Counties.

George Green was born about 1720 in Baltimore County, Maryland.

He married Sarah Musgrove and they lived in Baltimore County, Maryland.

George and Sarah's children probably included;

Thomas Green (1740, married Helen Wright),
Isaac Green (1742, married Elizabeth Ricketts),
George Green (1746, married Lettice),
Charles Green (1755, married Mary),
Elisha Green (1757, married Priscilla Chamberlain),
Clement Green (1758, married Sarah), and
Millicent Green (1761, married Edward Ricketts).

Thomas, Isaac, George, Elisha, and Clement settled on the waters of Standing Stone Creek in Pennsylvania some time between 1780 and 1785. George and Elisha brought enslaved people with them.

He bought Green Mount which was 422 acres and 62 perches in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania on December 3, 1784. It was bounded by land of Matthew Carswell, Jeremiah Ricketts, Joseph Long. He built a mill there. He brought enslaved people to Pennsylvania.

In 1784, Thomas Long applied for a warrant for 300 acres on Login's Branch joining James Dearmond and George Green.

In 1788 Clement Green was in Little's company.

On July 4, 1795 his children sold a tract of 400 acres on Warrior Ridge to Edward Ricketts. It was surveyed for George Green on December 3, 1784.

Slavery is an immoral system of forced labor where people are treated as property to be bought and sold. It was legal in the American Colonies and the United States until the Civil War.
 
Warrior Ridge
Warrior Ridge
 
 

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from History of Cambria County, Pennsylvania, Volume 2 by Henry Wilson Storey

George Green, the founder of this branch of the family in America, was born in England, came to this country some time before 1740 and settled in Maryland, near the city of Baltimore and in the county of that name. He married and had several children, the eldest of whom, Thomas Green, born 1740, led the way of the family into the Province of Pennsylvania. He was a worthy pioneer and eventually became a man of large property and influence. . .

. . .The other children of George Green, brothers and sisters of Thomas Green, who came to Pennsylvania at the time previously mentioned, settled north of the lands where Thomas made his home and along Warrior's Ridge, in Oneida township, Huntingdon county.

In Maryland those of them who had married were slave owners, and George and Elisha brought their bondmen to Pennsylvania. George built a mill on the site where now stands Cornpropt's Mill. He owned many slaves, some of whom were sold, while others were set free when slavery in Pennsylvania was abolished. One of these Negroes afterward lived many years in Huntingdon and always called himself "Thomas Green." After a time George Green sold his mill property and removed to near Sunbury, on the Susquehanna river.

Charles Green settled on Stone creek, where the old Rebecca Forge was afterward built, and still later went to Ohio to live.

Isaac Green owned the farm on the Ridge.

Millie Green married a Mr. Ricketts, and at her death was buried on the Ridge, where her brothers Clement and Isaac also were buried.

Elisha Green occupied a tract of land on the west side of Stone creek, three-quarters of a mile north of the town called Donation. George Green, son of Elisha, owned this land in 1870.


  

 
     
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©Roberta Tuller 2019
tuller.roberta@gmail.com
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