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An American Family History

Elizabeth Black Gilbert Raynor Kimball Kilham

The town of Ipswich was established on August 5, 1634, from common land called Agawam. On October 18, 1648, that portion called the "Village" at the New Meadows was set off as Topsfield. The boundary line between Ipswich and Topsfield was established, February 28, 1694.

Elizabeth Black was born about 1620 in England. She was the daughter of John Black. She came to America with her family as a child on the Talbot and they settled in Salem.

She married Humphrey Gilbert of Ipswich about 1655. Humphrey died in 1657 in Ipswich.

Elizabeth and Humphrey's children probably included:
John Gilbert (1656),
Martha Gilbert,
Hannah Gilbert,
Mary Gilbert, and
Abigail Gilbert.

She married William Reyner/Rayner/Raynor/Reiner/Rayuor on September 24, 1658. William was the son of Thurston Rayner.

William and Elizabeth's children included:

William died on October 26, 1672.

She married Henry Kimball .

In 1675 she, "Eliza Kemboll," inherited 50 shillings from her father.

Henry died in 1676 in Wenham. After Henry died two of Henry's sons, Richard and John, gave Elizabeth the property that she had brought to the marriage.

She married Daniel Kilham of Ipswich about 1678. In 1679 Daniel and Elizabeth sold John Lambson:

privilege and commonage belonging to ye house yt formerly was sd Gilberts' and Raynors,

the said house standing in Ipswich bounds on North side of Boston Road as it enters into Wenham from Ipswich.

She acknowledged the deed on June 19, 1684.

MaryRolandson
Mary White Rowlandson,Talcot
was captured by Native Americans
during King Philip's War (1675-1676).
American colonists continued to use British monetary units, namely the pound, shilling and pence for which £1 (or li) equalled 20s and 1s equalled 12d. In 1792 the dollar was established as the basic unit of currency.
The town of Ipswich was established on August 5, 1634, from common land called Agawam. On October 18, 1648, that portion called the "Village" at the New Meadows was set off as Topsfield. The boundary line between Ipswich and Topsfield was established, February 28, 1694.

 

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from Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County ..., Volume 1

William Rayner of Wenham fined for smoking tobacco in the streets of Salem.

 
 
 
Salt marshes which are between the ocean mud flats and grassy uplands, were desired by colonial farmers because salt marsh hay is more nutritious for cattle.

Boston was founded in 1630 by Puritan settlers from England.

Europeans who made the voyage to America faced a difficult journey of several months.

John Black

Database: Great Migration Begins: Immigrants to New England, 1620-33
Migration: 1629 on Talbot
First Residence: Salem
Removes: Beverly

Occupation: Husbandman

Church Membership: In list of Salem church members before reorganization in late 1636 [SChR 6]; membership prior to 6 March 1631/2 implied by freemanship.

Freeman: 6 March 1631/2 [MBCR 1:367].

Education: Signed petition of 13 May 1640 [EQC 7:201].

Offices: Essex petit jury 27 December 1636 [EQC 1:4]

Estate: 1636, granted 30 acres at Jeffrey's Creek as a freeman of Salem [STR 1:20, 25, 26, 37]. 25 December 1637, granted three-quarters of an acre of marsh, based on a household of four persons [STR 1:102].

Joined petition of 13 May 1640, made by seventeen Salem men, for land at Jeffrey's Creek "to erect a village there" [MBCR 1:288-89; EQC 7:201-02].

On 28 October 1668 John Black Sr. of Salem, planter, sold to William Browne Jr. of Salem for £6 one acre salt marsh in North Field [ELR 3:52].

On 20 April 1670 John Black Sr. of Beverly, husbandman, sold to "my son John Black of the same" for £8 house lot & orchard in Beverly

except two acres of land out of the said lot, which I do give & set over unto my son-in-law Isaack Davis, they to pay rent to John Sr.

and two acres meadow in Topsfield [ELR 3:140].

Administration granted 20 July 1675 to John, son of John Black, intestate;
ordered to pay 50s. to each of his three sisters, Eliza Kemboll, Pearcis Follett and Lydia Davis.
The inventory, taken 12 April 1675 by Thomas Lathrop and John Hill, amounted to £1110s., and included no real estate [EPR 3:9; EQC 6:50].

Birth: About 1591 (at Salem Quarterly Court for 9 September1645, the court exempted from training "John Black being poor & aged 54" [EQC 1:84]; note that this would make Black 38 years old in 1629, when we first see him with a family).

Death: 16 March 1674/5 [EPR 3:9; EQC 6:50, from inventory].

Marriage: By 1629; about July 1646 the "wife of John Blak" gave evidence in court against the wife of Thomas Oliver of Salem [EQC 1:99].

Children:

i. Child, died aboard Talbot 24 June 1629 [Higginson 76].

ii. Elizabeth, born about 1631; married
(1) about1655 Humphrey Gilbert; married
(2) Ipswich 24 September 1658 William Raynor; married
(3) by 1675 Henry Kimball; married
(4) by 1679 Daniel Kilham;
Elizabeth was alive in 1686, and died before 29 March 1693 [TAG 17:135-36].

iii. Persis, born about 1633; married Salem 29 November 1655 Robert Follett.

iv. Lydia, baptized Salem 25 December 1636 [SChR 16]; died soon, probably before 25 December 1637.

v. Lydia, baptized Salem 3 June 1638 [SChR 16]; married Beverly 28 September 1659 Isaac Davis [GDMNH 183-84].

vi. Daughter, baptized Salem 27 November 1640 [SChR18]; died without issue before 20 July 1675.

vii. John, born about 1642 (deposed 15 September 1673 "aged about thirty-one years" [EQC 5:216]); m.
(1) Salem 29 July 1664 Freeborne Sallowes (widow of Robert Sallowes and daughter of Peter Woolfe), who d. Beverly 30 January 1681 aged about 46 ; m.
(2) by 1686 Deborah _____ (Elizabeth, daughter of John and Deborah Black, b. Beverly 31 May 1686); poss. m. (3) Beverly (int.) 18 August 1700 Mary Morgan.

Any man entering a colony or becoming a a member the church, was not free. He was not forced to work, but his movements were carefully observed to see if they followed the Puritanical ideal. After this probationary period, he became a "freeman." Men then took the Oath of a Freeman where they vowed to defend the Commonwealth and not to overthrow the government.

American colonists continued to use British monetary units, namely the pound, shilling and pence for which £1 (or li) equalled 20s and 1s equalled 12d. In 1792 the dollar was established as the basic unit of currency.
Women played an essential role in American society as mothers and homemakers.
 
 
 

from Genealogical and Personal Memoirs, Volume 1 edited by William Richard Cutter

. . .Humphrey Gilbert, born in England, 1616; commoner in Ipswich. Massachusetts, 1648; bought lands 1650; died 1657, leaving second wife Elizabeth, only son John, and four daughters—Martha, Hannah, Mary and Abigail.

John Gilbert, only son of Humphrey Gilbert, lived in Ipswich hamlet, near the Wenham line, and was a member of the church in Wenham until the organization of the church in Ipswich hamlet, when he was one of its first deacons.

By his wife Elizabeth he had twelve children; the eldest, John Gilbert, born July 14, 1678, married, 1799, Martha Dodge, of Beverly, removed to Kettle Cove, and was the progenitor of the Gilberts of Cape Ann.

He sold his lands in Wenham in 1703, and went to Gloucester to live in 1704.

By his wife Martha he had sons, John, William and Jonathan, and three daughters. His son Jonathan married Abigail Newbury. . .

 
 
 
 

from The Driver Family

[Henry Kimball]. . .married, second, Elizabeth, widow of William Raynor (son of Thurston Raynor), who previously had been the second wife of Humphrey Gilbert, of Ipswich Hamlet, and probably the mother of his only son, John Gilbert.

Mr. Humphrey Gilbert died Feb. 13, 1657-8, and his widow, Elizabeth aforesaid, married, Sept. 24,1658, Wm Rayner, Reiner, Rainer, or Rayuor, who died Oct. 26, 1672.

She married fourth, Daniel Kilham, Sr., of Ipswich, Mass., with whom she unites with a deed, Dec. 25, 1679, conveying to John Lambson the

"privilege and commonage belonging to ye house yt formerly was sd Gilberts' and Raynors,"

"the said house standing in Ipswich bounds on North side of Boston Road as it enters into Wenham from Ipswich."

"Acknowledged by Elizabeth Kilham, June 19, 1684.
Samuel Adams and Isaac Comins witnesses."
New Eug. Gen. and Hist. Register, Vol. XXIX. p. 109, by H. F. Waters.