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An American Family History

John Warner and Hannah Batchelder

 
Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts
 
The town of Ipswich was established on August 5, 1634, from common land called Agawam. On October 18, 1648, that portion called the "Village" at the New Meadows was set off as Topsfield. The boundary line between Ipswich and Topsfield was established, February 28, 1694.

It was common for bequests to include wearing apparel.

John Warner and Hannah Batchelder married on April 20, 1665 in Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts.

Elizabeth Warner Gott was born on June 30, 1666. John Warner, was born about 1669. Daniel Warner was born April 16, 1672. The first child named, William Warner was born on September 22, 1672. He died young. The second child named William Warner was born on June 30, 1673. He died in July 1673. Hannah Warner was born on May 14, 1674. Susannah Warner Fiske was born on March 3, 1675/76.

Hannah (the mother) died March 10 1687/88. At that time they were living on the Pine Swamp farm.

On October 5, 1693 John bought a house, barn and 80 acres from G. Haldey for 220£. The farm was bounded on the northeast by S. Chapman and the road, on the southeast by Skillion, on the southwest by Perkins and Harris meadow, and on the west and northwest by Joseph Metcalf.

About 1691, John married Mrs. Mary Prince, the widow of Jonathan Prince. She already had two children, Nathan Prince and Jonathan Prince.

Nathaniel Warner was born on July 6, 1693. Mary Warner Adams was born on August 18, 1695. Abigail Warner was born on April 8, 1697. Abigail died on April 6, 1698.

Hannah (the daughter) died on July 4, 1696. John, Jr. died on July 24, 1697 when he was 27.

John, Sr. died on April 10, 1712. His will was dated February 7, 1711. He left his son, Nathaniel, his home and 60 acres of land which was valued at at £250. Nathaniel would receive his bequest when he was 21 years old.

His wife Mary was given the right "to enjoy the parlor, and chamber over the parlor, and have support." He also remembered his daughters, Elizabeth Gott, Susannah Fiske, and Mary, who was 15 years old and not married and his stepsons, Nathan and Jonathan Prince.

MaryRolandson
Mary White Rowlandson,Talcot
was captured by Native Americans
during King Philip's War (1675-1676).
Old Style Calendar
Before 1752 the year began on Lady Day, March 25th,. Dates between January 1st and March 24th were at the end of the year. Old Style (O.S.) and New Style (N.S.) are used to indicate whether the year has been adjusted. Often both dates are used.

American colonists continued to use British monetary units, namely the pound, shilling and pence for which £1 (or li) equalled 20s and 1s equalled 12d. In 1792 the dollar was established as the basic unit of currency.

Lush forests in Colonial America allowed settlers to build wooden homes.

 

divider

 
Essex County, Massachusetts was created on May 10, 1643 by the General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, when it ordered "that the whole plantation within this jurisdiction be divided into four sheires."

from Batchelder, Batcheller Genealogy, 1898 by Frederick Pierce

Hannah, bap. June 23, 1644; m. April 20, 1665, John Warner. He was b. Ipswich, in 1642; d. there April 10, 1712. She was

niece of Henry Batcheller, who died seized of considerable real estate in Ipswich.

John Warner was one of the administrators of Henry's estate in 1683.

Hannah d. March 10, 1688, and he m. 2d, in 1691, Mary Prince, wid. of John, of Salem; res. Ipswich, Mass.

Ch. : 1. Elizbeth, b. June 30, 1666; m. Gott.
2. John, b. ; d. July 24, 1697.
3. William, b. Sept. 22, 1672; d. soon. y/z. William, b. June 30, 1673; d. July, 1673.
4. Hannah, b. May 14, 1674; d. July 4, 1696.
5. Susannah, b. March 3, 1676; m. Joseph Fiske . . .
6. William, b. Nov. 2, 1679; d. Aug. 30, 1684.

John Warner had 3 ch. by second wife.

7. Abigail, b. Oct. 18, 1681.

He purchased, 5 Oct., 1683, of G. Hadley, for £220, dwelling house, barn, etc., and 80 acres, and on May 12, 1698, he conveyed this farm to his son-in-law, Joseph Fisk, bounded
N. E. by S. Chapman and the road;
S. E. by Skillson;
S. W. by Perkins and Harris meadow;
W. and N. W. by Jos. Metcalf.

His will, dated 7 Feb., 1711, gives to his son Nathaniel, when 21, his dwelling house, etc., and 60 acres of land (inventory at £250), his wife Mary to enjoy the parlor, and chamber over the parlor, and have support; also mentions daughter Elizabeth Gott., Sus. Fisk, and Mary, 15 years old and stepsons ("sons-in-law") Nathan and Jonathan Prince. He appears to be living on the Pine Swamp farm in 1688; but it is doubtful whether he lived there till his death.

Estate inventories give us a glance into the home life of Colonial Americans.
 
 
Early European settlers in the American colonies were mostly farmers and craftsmen. They had to work hard to provide daily neccesities for themselves.

The New England Historical & Genealogical Register, Volume 20

John [Warner], children by 1st wife Hannah Bacheldor.
Elizabeth, b. 30 June, 1666, m. — Gott.
John, b. , d. 24 July, 1697.
Daniel b. 16 April, 1672.
Hannah b. 14 May, 1674, d. 4 July, 1696.
Susannah b. 3 March, 1676, m. Jos. Fisk.
William b. 2 March, 1679, d. 30 Aug., 1684;

children by 2d wife, Mary Prince.
Nathaniel
b. 6 July, 1693.
Mary
b. 18 Aug., 1695, m. Win. Adams, pub. 31 Dec., 1715-children, Samuel,5 Charles,' Caleb, and Thomas.4
Abigail,
b. 8 April, 1697, d. 6 April, 1698.

He purchased, 5 Oct., 1683, of G. Hadley, for £220, dwelling house, barn, &c., and 80 acres; and on 12 May, 1698, he conveyed this farm to his son-in-law, Joseph Fisk, bounded N. E. by S. Chapman and the road, S. E. by Skillion, S. W. by Perkins and Harris meadow, W. and N. W. by Jos. Metcalf.

His will, dated 7 Feb., 1711, gives to his son Nathaniel, when 21, his dwelling house, &c., and 60 acres land, (inventory at £250), his wife Mary to enjoy the parlor, and chamber over the parlor, and have support, also mentions daughter Elizabeth Gott, Sus. Fisk, and Mary, 15 years old, and step sons ("sons-in-law") Nathan and Jonathan Prince. He appears to be living on the Pine Swamp farm in 1688; but it is doubtful whether he lived there till his death.

The town common (commons) was a small, open field at the center of the town which was jointly owned. It was used as a marketplace, a place for the militia to drill, or for grazing livestock.