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An American Family History

 

Osborne Family

 
  Osborn, Osborne, Osburn, Osbern, Osbourn  
     

Rowan County, North Carolina was formed in 1753 from the northern part of Anson County. In 1770, the eastern part was combined with the western part of Orange County to become Guilford County.. In 1771 the northeastern part of what remained of Rowan County became Surry County. In 1777 the western part of Rowan County became Burke County. In 1788 the western part became Iredell County. In 1822 the eastern part became Davidson County. Finally, in 1836 the part of Rowan County north of the South Yadkin River became Davie County.

The American Revolution was ended in 1783 when the Treaty of Paris was signed.

Ephraim Osborn, Sr. was born about 1723.

Enoch Osborne (1741, married Jane Hash),
Solomon Osborne (1743, married Nancy Davidson),
Robert Osborne (1745),
Stephen Osborne (1746,)
Zachariah Osborne (1748),
James Osborne (1750)
Ellender Osborne (1751, married William Hash),
Ephraim, Osborne, Jr. (1752),
Jonathan Osborne (1753, married Nancy Howell),
Jeremiah Osborne (1755),
Nancy Osborne (1756, married Jesse Lane),
George Osborne (1762),
Cornelius Osborne (1764), and
Chloe Osborne (1765, married Samuel Howard).

In 1759 to 1768. Ephraim Osborn was on the tax list of Rowan County, North Carolina.

Enoch Osborne and brothers, Solomon and Ephraim, went into what is now Watauga, N.C., on a hunting trip, deer being plentiful in that section. Getting wet by a shower of rain, and wet bushes, they struck up camp in the evening, and lay down to sleep and rest, hanging up their clothes by the camp fire to dry.

The Indians surprised them by shooting into the camp and killing Solomon Osborne; an Indian chased Enoch some distance, and lost him in the dark. Ephraim, after fleeing from camp carefully crept back in the dark to his horse that was fastened with a hickory bark halter to a tree, loosed him and rode home. Enoch returned home without shoes and in his night clothing.

The 1771 tax list for Botetourt County, Virginia included Robert, Enoch, and Jonathan Osborn.

In 1772, he was on William Herbert's tax list in the short-lived Fincastle County.

In 1773, he was on the delinquent tax payer list for Fincastle County, Virginia.

On December 14 1774, Ephraim Osborn, Sr. was granted 260 acres, in Fincastle County on Saddle Creek, a Branch of New River.

In 1774 Enoch, Ephraim, and Stephen were in David Looney's Company in Fincastle County, Virginia.

In 1777, Jeremiah Ozburn, Capt. Enoch Ozburn, Sr., and Stephen Ozburn, Sr. took the Oath of Allegiance in Montgomery County, Virginia.  

In 1777, Enoch was a justice in Montgomery County and he served as a captain in the Montgomery County militia.

Stephen, Ephraim, and Enoch Osborn were on a list of surveys presented by the Loyal Land Company to the Land Office in Augusta County, Virginia before May, 1783.

In 1786, Ephraim, Sr’s. name was on the Montgomery County tax list.

In, 1794, Ephraim, Sr. was exempted from paying tax in Grayson County, Virginia.

Fincastle County, Virginia was created in 1772 from Botetourt County and abolished in 1776. It was divided into Montgomery, Washington and Kentucky Counties.

North Carolina was one of the thirteen original Colonies. It was first settled by small farmers and grew quickly in the mid 18th century.

 
 
 

James Osborn was born on January 4, 1765 in Rowan County, North Carolina. He was the only child of Solomon Osborne and Nancy Davidson. Soloman was killed before James was born and Nancy married Jonathan Wood.

In 1767, James went with his mother and step-father, from Virginia to Big Moccasin Creek near Fort Houston.

On November 11, 1782, James Osborn settled on 230 acres in the Castlewood's section of Russell County, Virginia. Scott County was created from parts of Washington, Lee, and Russell Counties in 1814.

Solomon Osborne (1785, married Henrietta Livingston),
Samuel Osborne (1788, married Winnie Ratcliff),
Tabitha Osborne (1791, married Zedikiah Coody),
Delila Osborne (1796, married Silas Ratcliff),
Wood Osborne (1797, married Catherine Livingston),
Henry Osborne (1799, married Sarah Dixon),
John Osborne (1803, married Nancy).

 

 
 
 
 

from Pioneer Settlers of Grayson County, Virginia by B.F .Nuckolls

Esq Enoch Osborne settled on New River near Bridle Creek; this for many years was known as the Osborne settlement. Enoch Osborne had 3 brothers, Solomon, Ephraim, and Jonathan, who came to this country with their families about the same time and settled on New River near together.

A fort was built on the farm now occupied by Joshua Osborne and son, John, at Ancella Post Office. Indian depredations were common in the border settlements, and preparations for protection and defense were necessary.

It was fortunate for society that the first settlers were people of moral worth and piety. Enoch Osborne's wife was a Miss Hash. He and his wife were Christians and aided very much in planting the standard of Christian civilization over the land that was so recently inhabited by savages. Their home was a resting place for the wayworn traveling preachers. The venerable Bishop Asbury called with them, rested, and took refreshments, as he was making his ministerial tours through this newly settled country, preaching the gospel. It was at the Old Fort where Esq Enoch Osborne, Sr, first located a home.

An incident occurred with the Osborne brothers in their newly occupied territory that tells of the dangers and exposures to which pioneer settlers were subjected. Enoch Osborne and brothers Solomon and Ephraim went into what is now  Watauga North Carolina on a hunting trip, deer being plentiful in that section. Getting wet by a shower of rain and wet bushes, they struck up camp in the evening and lay down to sleep and rest, hanging up their clothes by the campfire to dry. The Indians surprised them by shooting into the camp and killing Solomon Osborne; an Indian chased Enoch some distance and lost him in the dark.  Ephraim, after fleeing from camp carefully, crept back in the dark to his horse that was fastened with a hickory bark halter to a tree, loosed him, and rode home. Enoch returned home without shoes, and in his night clothing. These facts are gathered from Mrs. Mary McMullen, wife of Hon Lafayette McMullen, member of Congress, from Scott County, Virginia for several sessions. Mrs. McMullen, before her marriage, was Miss Mary Woods, granddaughter of Solomon Osborne, who was murdered in the camp by the Indians.

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
     
 

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from Russell County, Virginia Will Book 2, Page 257

Will of William Davison , executed 04 Jun 1811:

At a court held for Russell County the 4th day of June 1810 . . . This Instrument of writing purporting to be the non cupative will of William Davison dec'd was proved by the oaths of the above named Jonathan Wood & James Osborn, and established as the will of the said William Davison dec'd and ordered to be recorded.