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An American Family History

 

The Baker Family

 

Washington Count, Virginia was formed from Fincastle County in 1777. It originally contained Sullivan County, Tennessee.

Isaac Baker was born about 1726 in Pennsylvania.

He lived in Maryland and then moved to Washington County, Virginia about 1770. He bought land with his close friend Evan Shelby.

He married Catherine Postlethwaite

Joshua Baker (1744),
Hatchy Baker,
Mary Baker (1745, married Thomas Van Swearingen),
Susannah Baker (1749, married Thomas Worley),
Isaac Baker, Jr. (1755, married Elizabeth),
William Baker, 
John Baker
Thomas Baker (1761)
Alice Baker (married Ephraim Smith),
Evan Baker (1763),
Catherine Baker (married David Worley)

Isaac purchased part of the Sapling Grove tract from the executors of James Patton in 1768-1771 for £304. His part was 978 acres on Shallow Creek. The 1,946 acre Sapling Grove tract was surveyed and sold to Colonel James Patton in 1749. John Buchanan received it from executors of Patton's estate. About 1768 General Shelby and Isaac Baker bought it.

Isaac married Mary, Anthony Head's widow, on on September 4, 1787.

Isaac's will was recorded in Washington County, Virginia. He left his estate to his children, Isaac, William, Healchy, his sons-in-law Thomas Van Swearingen, Thomas Worley. The executors were Isaac Baker and Ephriam Smith. The will was witnessed by John Campbell, Henry Harkelrod Michael Snider, John Snyder

Lush forests in Colonial America allowed settlers to build wooden homes.

     
 

 

 
 

 

 
     
 

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Washington County, Virginia Surveys, Page 364
Isaac Baker
300 acres
Preemption Warrant dated December 20, 1781 #1977
on both sides of Moore's Creek & Carmack's Creek, the waters of Beaver Creek
beginning corner to the Sapling Grove tract
crossing the great road
above a Mill pond corner to Sapling Grove tract
February 22, 1787

 
     
 

Washington County, Virginia Surveys, Page 364
Isaac Baker
410 acres
treasury warrant #2455 dated February 7, 1780
on the waters of Beaver Creek, the waters of Holstein [Holston] River
beginning corner to the Sapling Grove tract of land
corner to Laughlin's land
by some rocks on a path
corner to the Timbergrove tract
corner to the Sapling Grove tract
July 30, 1787

The Holston River in northeast Tennessee has given its name to Holston Mountain and the Holston Valley.
     
 

Washington County, Virginia Surveys, Page 365
Isaac Baker
225 acres
treasury warrant dated October 5, 1781 #6965
on the waters of Beaver Creek, a branch of Holstein [Holston] River
line of the Timbergrove tract
near a corner of the Sapling Grove Tract
by a Mill pond
February 22, 1787

 
     
 

Washington County, Virginia Surveys, Page 365
Isaac Baker
400 acres
treasury warrant #2455 dated February 7, 1780
on the waters of Beaver Creek and joining the lines of Sapling Grove tract on the south side
by a road
by a path
on a road
corner to Smith's land
corner to the Sapling Grove Tract
February 23, 1787

 
     
 

Washington County, Virginia Deed Book 1, p. 266
10 Mar 1792
Isaac Baker to David Worley,
£40,
357 acres on Beaver Creek.

 
     
 

Washington County, Virginia Deed Book 1, p. 386
16 Sep 1794
Isaac Baker to Wm. Boulton,
£50,
300 acres on both sides of Moses Creek and Carmack’s Creek,
waters of Beaver Creek.

 
     
 

Washington County, Virginia Deed Book 2, p. 68

15 Mar 1796.
Will of Isaac Baker, his estate to his children, Isaac, William, Healchy, his sons-in-law Thomas Van Swearingen, Thomas Worley.
Executors: Isaac Baker and Ephriam Smith.
Wits: John Campbell, Henry Halkeroad, Michael Snider, John Snyder.

 
     
 

Washington County, Virginia Deed Book 1, p. 503
9 Dec 1796
Isaac Baker [Jr.] and Elizabeth his wife to Solomon Sell,
$933,
550 acres on the south side of Beaver Creek, being a part of the Sapling Grove Tract.

 
     
 

Washington County, Virginia Deed Book 1, p. 504.
9 Dec 1796
Isaac Baker [Jr.] and Elizabeth his wife to William Baker,
£50,
240 acres on both sides of Beaver Creek, being a part of the Sapling Grove Tract.

 
     
     
 
Marylander Evan Shelby and one Isaac Baker had purchased the Sapling Grove tract from the executors of James Patton in 1768
1771 for £304 each with Baker's deed describing the transaction as "...978 acres, being a part of a tract of 1986 acres, on Shallow Creek, a branch of the Middle Fork of Indian (now Holstein [Holston]) River..." (Washington County, Virginia DB2:96), and Shelby's as "973 acres on Shallow Creek, a branch of Beaver Creek..." (Washington County, Virginia DB2:261)
 
     
 

From Appalachians and Race, edited by John C. Inscoe

Isaac Baker, Jr. was the son of Isaac Baker, Sr., a Pennsylvania native who moved to Maryland and then migrated to the Holston country in 1772 with Evan Shelby. Isaac Senior was one of the purchasers of Shelby Grove tract. Isaac Junior, one of five Baker sons, received full title to the Sapling Grove tract and eight black slaves in Isaac Senior's will of 1796.

 
     
 

Colonel William Preston, by his will, appointed John Preston, Francis Preston, John Breckenridge and John Brown his executors, and on the 2d of May, 1796, John Preston, one of the executors of William Preston, executor of John Buchanan, deceased, executed a deed to Isaac Baker, Jr., for the 973 acres of land contracted to his father, Isaac Baker, deceased, and on the 22d of November, 1798, Francis Preston, one of the executors of William Preston, executor of John Buchanan, deceased, conveyed to Isaac Shelby, as executor of Evan Shelby, deceased, the 973 acres of land contracted to Evan Shelby by John Buchanan. The consideration paid by Isaac Baker was 304 pounds, and by Evan Shelby 304 pounds. This 1,946
acre tract of land was patented to William Preston and William Campbell, executors of John Buchanan, deceased, on the 2d of November, 1779.

Evan Shelby and Isaac Baker were intimate friends before their emigration to the Holston, as evidenced by the fact that Shelby had named one of his sons Isaac for Isaac Baker, while Baker had named one of his sons Evan for Evan Shelby. Isaac Shelby won distinction at King's mountain and was several times Governor of Kentucky, while Evan Baker took an active part in the cause of the Colonies and served during the Revolutionary war as deputy commissary on the waters of the Holston.

Isaac Baker by his will devised his moiety in the Sapling Grove tract of land to his sons, Isaac Baker, Jr., and William Baker.

Evan Shelby and Isaac Baker, in their lifetime, conveyed small portions of their respective properties to Henry Harkleroad, William Bolton and John O'Brian.

It is worthy of mention at this point that Evan Shelby and Isaac Baker, in their old age, were bereft of their wives, and subsequently remarried—the former, Isabella Elliott; the latter, Mary Head, a young widow—and each was required by his prospective wife to make a settlement upon her before marriage, Evan Shelby conferring upon his second wife a considerable interest in his personal property, which was large, and of which a considerable number of slaves formed a part, and in his real estate at Sapling Grove, while Isaac Baker made a similar provision for his second wife, and inaddition thereto conveyed to the two sons of Mary Head by her former marriage one hundred acres of land each.

Stirring scenes were often witnessed in the Sapling Grove community from the date of the settlement made by Shelby and Baker until the year 1800. The armies of the State and large delegations of Indians were many times visitors to this community.. .

 Isaac Baker was buried in this same graveyard [in Bristol, Tennessee].

Isaac Baker, Sr., at the time of his death, left six sons, to-wit: William Baker, Isaac Baker, Joshua Baker, Evan Baker, John Baker and Thomas Baker and several daughters, to-wit: Hatchy Baker, Susannah, who married Thomas Worley, Mary, who married Thomas Van Swearingen and Catharine, who married Ephraim Smith.

William Baker, who obtained an interest in the Sapling Grove by the will of his father, removed to Knox county, Tennessee, and on the 10th of September, 1799, conveyed his interest in said land, being three hundred and forty-eight acres, to John Goodson, for the sum of $3,000, and this tract of land afterwards became the property of Colonel Samuel E. Goodson, and the location of a large part of East Bristol. . .