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An American Family History

Nawman Family

 

Thomas Nawman was born about 1749 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

He married Elizabeth Huffman.

Thomas Nawman, Jr. (1780, married Catherine Baker),
John Nawman (1775),
Elizabeth Nawman (1780, married Samuel Baker)
Barbara Nawman (1784),
Eva Nawman (1787),
Mary Nawman (1796, married Samuel Baker),
Susanna Nawman (1795, married John Baker),
Jacob Nawman (1795)

There were two Samuel Bakers who were born about the same time. One was the son of Henry Baker and the other Samuel Baker was the son of Jacob. It isn't clear which Samuel married Mary. Mary's siblings married children of Henry.

 
 

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from A Standard History of Springfield and Clark County, Ohio edited by Benjamin F. Prince

Jacob and Elizabeth (Kemp) Nawman, were natives of Virginia, where the great-grandfather, Thomas Nawman, was born in 1779.

About 1801 Thomas Nawman brought his family to Clark County, Ohio, traveling across country with three wagons drawn by oxen. He took up land in German Township, cleared his farm, improved it, and developed a large property. This farm was later divided among his children, and Jacob Nawman received his share.

 
     

In the War of 1812 (1812-1815) the United States declared war on England because of trade restrictions, impressment, and British support for Indian attacks. They signed the Treaty of Ghent on December 24, 1814 after reaching a stalemate.

Samuel Nawman, farmer; P.O. Springfield. He is a native of German Township, born Feb. 3, 1819; he is a son of Thomas and Catharine (Baker) Nawman, natives of Virginia.

The grandfather, Thomas Nawman, is supposed to have been born in Massachusetts. He was one of those resolute men who resisted the English rule and imposition of heavy duties, and assisted in throwing overboard the cargo of tea in Boston harbor, and which, followed by other acts and events, resulted in the war of the Revolution.

Thomas Nawman [Jr.], the father, emigrated to Ohio in 1806, coming through the entire journey on horseback, and located in German Township. Soon after his arrival, he was afflicted with a white-swelling, during which time he lived with one of the early settlers by the name of Friermood, with whom he stayed two years; thence returned to Virginia, and, in 1809, came back to Ohio, the entire family of his father coming with him, and here the grandfather and the father lived and died, being truly pioneers of the county, enduring the many dangers and hardships of that early day, struggling with the wilderness, the wild beasts, the Indians, and the difficulties of the War of 1812. But Mr. Nawman, the father, lived to see these difficulties over-come, and fine farms take the place of the wilderness, and the hand of civilization to bring forth towns and cities, and the comforts and conveniences of one of the finest countries in the world. He died in January, 1863, aged 82 years. His wife died in April, 1864, aged 79 years.

They were parents of seven children, three now living - Samuel, Magdalene and Amanda. Our subject  lived with his father until 35 years of age. He was married, Aug. 26, 1855, to Louisa M., daughter of William and Matilda Rhonemus, he a native of Clinton Co., Ohio, and she of Virginia; issue, thirteen children; nine now survive - Thomas W., Henry B., Emma, Charles L., Ida, George W., Jasper G., Oly and Carrie. Mr. Nawman, after his marriage, located upon the farm where he now resides, and which has been in possession of the Nawman family seventy-one years; the farm consists of 133 acres of land, on Mad River, with good buildings and improvements, constituting a fine farm.

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