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An American Family History

Hutchinson Family

 

 

 
     
 

 
     
 

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Early European settlers in the American colonies were mostly farmers and craftsmen. They had to work hard to provide daily neccesities for themselves.

Benjamin Hutchinson, son of Joseph Hutchinson, was baptized September 26, 1666, and died intestate in 1733. While an infant he was adopted into the family of Deacon Nathaniel Ingersoll, whose only child had died, and brought up by him as a son. He lived with Mr. Ingersoll until he was about twenty-one years of age, at which time his foster father conveyed to him by deed of gift ten acres of upland and three of meadow,

October 2, 1691. Deacon Ingersoll, in his will made in 1719. bequeathed to Benjamin Hutchinson,

in consideration of the great help he had been while living with him, and after he had left,

all the remaining part of his whole estate, real and personal, after making provision for the remainder of his family.

He was a farmer, and lived on a part of the homestead which had been his father's. He gave away most of his property to members of his family before he died. He and his wife were witnesses in certain witchcraft cases in Salem.

He married (first) Jane Phillips, died 1711, daughter of Walter and Margaret Phillips. He was received into the church May 7, 1699, and his wife May 28, following.

He married (second), January 26, 1714-15, Abigail Foster.

Children, by first wife:
1. Son, died young.
2. Benjamin, born August 31, 1690, died September 18, 1690.
3. Hannah, born May 7, 1692, married, March 6, 1717-18, William Henfield.
4. Benjamin, born January 27, 1693-94.
5. Bethiah, born January 5, 1695-96.
6. Nathaniel, born May 3, 1698.
7. Sarah, born December 26, 1701, married, November 17, 1725, Cornelius Putnam.
8. Bartholomew, born April 27, 1703.
9. Jane, born August 1, 1705, married. September 8, 1726, Jonathan Buxton.
10. Israel, baptized October 5, 1708, died young.
11. John, died before 1733.

Child of second wife:
12. Jonathan, born July 18, 1716

A Puritan woman's clothing consisted of underpants, stockings, linen, shift, petticoat, chemise (underblouse), bolster (a padded roll tied around the hips under the skirt), bodice, skirt, apron, coif (cap), outer gown and shoes. A woman might wear a ruff or bow and an apron. Cloaks were worn instead of coats. Women carried a small cloth draw-string bag or reticule and perhaps wore a chatelaine.

Salem is in Essex County, Massachusetts and was a significant seaport in early America. John Endicott obtained a patent from England and arrived there in 1628. Salem originally included much of the North Shore, including Marblehead. Salem Village also included Peabody and parts of Beverly, Middleton, Topsfield, Wenham and Manchester-by-the-Sea.