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An American Family History

Gaither

All Hallows or South River Parish, Anne Arundel County, Maryland was created in 1672.

John Gaither was born about 1646.

His wife was named Ruth.

His children included:
John Gaither, Jr. (1677)
Ruth Gaither (born 1679, married John Warfield),
Benjamin Gaither (1681),
Rachel Gaither (1687, married Samuel White),
Mary Gaither (1692),
Rebecca Gaither (1695),
Susan Gaither (1697).

In 1663, John Gaither and Robert Proctor surveyed Abington, at the head of South River. It adjoined Freeman's Fancy, Freeman's Stone and Freeman's Landing.

In 1674, Joseph Morley made Robert Proctor and John Gaither his executors, and legatees of his whole estate. They sold Morley's Lot and Morley's Grove to Colonel William Burgess.

In 1690, Captain John Browne sold John Gaither, land that had been laid off for Mr. Chapman out of Freeman's Fancy. Captain Browne, also, sold John Gaither, lands in Abington, recently held by Robert Proctor.

He died without a will and a commission consisting of John Howard, John Hammond and John Duvall, divided the estate. At the time of his death, in 1705, John Gaither held all of Freeman's lands and all of Abington, except that held by William Ridgely and Elizabeth [Clark], his wife.

John's widow, Ruth, married Francis Hardesty.

 

 
 
 
 

John Gaither, Jr. was about 1677.

He married Jane Buck.

John and Jane's children included:
Benjamin Gaither,
Alexander Gaither,
Richard Gaither,
David Gaither,
Amos Gaither,
Joshua Gaither, and
Rezin Gaither.

His second wife was Elizabeth Duvall.

John and Elizabeth's children included:
John Gaither,
Edward Gaither and
Samuel Gaither.

 
 

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Maryland was established with religious freedom for Catholics. The colonial economy was based on tobacco cultivated by Africans who had been enslaved.

In 1607 the London Company established Virginia as the first permanent New World English colony.

from The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland by Joshua Dorsey Warfield

John Gaither, of South River

The name of John Gaither was sixth on the list of the corporation of James City. (Hoiten.)

Came in the Assurance, 1635, Jo. Gater and Joan Gater, aged 36 and 23 years, and John Gater, 15 years.(Hoiten's List of Va.)

On a neck of land, on the eastern branch of Elizabeth River, the Virginia records, already quoted, show John Gater (Gaither) seated upon five hundred acres for the transportation of ten persons. He was, also, a contributor to the support of the Non-Conformist Church.

In 1662, the following record was made in Maryland:

Then came John Gaither and demanded the renewment of a warrant for 450 acres—renewed.

In 1663, John Gaither and Robert Proctor surveyed Abington, at the head of South River. It adjoined Freeman's Fancy, Freeman's Stone and Freeman's Landing.

These three settlers were sons-in-law of Joseph Morley, whose will, of 1674, made Robert Proctor and John Gaither his executors, and legatees of his whole estate.

They sold Morley's Lot and Morley's Grove to Colonel William Burgess [for Morley's Estate].

Robert Proctor and Elizabeth, his wife, late widow of John Freeman, and daughter of Joseph Morley, sold Freeman's lands to Captain George Puddington, which were later bought by John Gaither from Captain Edward Burgess, executor of Captain Puddington.

Captain John Browne, mariner, of London, sold, in 1690, to James Finley, three hundred acres out of Abington; said land laid out for John Dearing. And during that same year, Captain John Browne sold to John Gaither, lands that had been laid off for Mr. Chapman out of Freeman's Fancy. Captain Browne, also, sold to John Gaither, lands in Abington, recently held by Robert Proctor. At the time of his death, in 1705, John Gaither held all of Freeman's lands and all of Abington, except that held by William Ridgely and Elizabeth [Clark], his wife.

His widow, Ruth (Morley) Gaither, married again, Francis Hardesty. Dying intestate, a commission consisting of John Howard, John Hammond and John Duvall, divided the estate.

His heirs were,
John Gaither, Jr., born 1677;
Ruth, born 1679 —John Warfield (of Richard and Elinor Browne Warfield);
Benjamin [Gaither], born 1681;
Rachel, born 1687—Samuel White;
Mary, born 1692;
Rebecca, born 1695;
Susan, born 1697.

John Gaither contributed liberally to the defense of the settlers against Indian invasions.

John Gaither, Jr., as heir-at-law, deeded to his brother Benjamin, and to Edward Gaither, portions of his father's estate.

The issue of John and Jane (Buck) Gaither were,
Benjamin,
Alexander,
Richard,
David,
Amos,
Joshua and
Rezin,
all inheriting Abington.

By a second marriage, to Elizabeth [Duvall], widow of Benjamin Warfield, he had
John,
Edward and
Samuel Gaither.

These inherited and located upon Left Out, near Dayton, Howard County.

Mister ( Mr.) was derived from master and Mrs. and Miss were derived from mistress. They indicated people of superior social status in colonial America.
Anne Arundel County, Maryland was established in 1650.
Children of Richard Beard and Rachel Robins:
  • Ruth Beard
  • Rachel Beard Stimpson Proctor Kilburn Freeborn
  • Richard Beard, Jr.
  • John Beard
  • Rebecca Beard Nicholson
  •  

    European and indiginous American fought fierce battles as the Europeans expanded their territory.

    Colonial Maryland used the headright system to encourage settlement. Land was granted to anyone who would pay fthe transportation costs of a laborer.

     
     
     
    from The Founders of Anne Arundel and Howard Counties, Maryland by Joshua Dorsey Warfield

    In 1662, the following record was made in Maryland:

    Then came John Gaither and demanded the renewment of a warrant for 450 acres—renewed.

    In 1663, John Gaither and Robert Proctor surveyed Abington, at the head of South River. It adjoined Freeman's Fancy,Freeman's Stone and Freeman's Landing.

    These three settlers were sons-in-law of Joseph Morley, whose will, of 1674, made Robert Proctor and John Gaither his executors, and legatees of his whole estate. . .

    His widow, Ruth (Morley) Gaither, married again, Francis Hardesty. . .

    The first European settlements in Maryland were made in 1634 when English settlers created a permanent colony.