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An American Family History

Elizabeth Kimball Jewett

Various spellings of Kimball:
Kemball, Kembolde, Kembold
Essex County, Massachusetts was created on May 10, 1643 by the General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, when it ordered "that the whole plantation within this jurisdiction be divided into four sheires."

Elizabeth Kimball Jewett and her twin, Corporal Richard Kimball, were born on September 22, 1665 in Ipswich, Essex County, Massachusetts. Her parents were John Kimball and Mary Bradstreet.

According to The Old families of Salisbury and Amesbury, Massachusetts by David Webster Hoyt she married Jeremiah Jewett on January 4, 1687/88 in Topsfield. Jeremiah was born December 20, 1662. His parents were Jeremiah Jewett and Sarah Dickinson.

(Other sources say that Jeremiah married Elizabeth Kimball daughter of Caleb Kimball; Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of the State of Massachusetts by William Richard Cutter)

Elizabeth and Jeremiah's children included:
Elizabeth Jewett Day (married Thomas Day),
Hannah Jewett Pearson (July 16, 1690, married Stephen Pearson)
Aaron Jewett (February 10, 1693- June 27, 1694),
Moses Jewett (October 13, 1695- June 11, 1715),
Aaron Jewett (June 13. 1699),
Mary Jewett Bennett Lakeman (June 30, 1703, married Joseph Bennett and Soloman Lakeman), and
Mercy Jewett Chapman (February 25, 1706, married Daniel Chapman).

Elizabeth died in Ipswich in August, 1728. After her death Jeremiah married Elizabeth Bugg. Jeremiah died February 15, 1731.

A Puritan woman's clothing consisted of underpants, stockings, linen, shift, petticoat, chemise (underblouse), bolster (a padded roll tied around the hips under the skirt), bodice, skirt, apron, coif (cap), outer gown and shoes. A woman might wear a ruff or bow and an apron. Cloaks were worn instead of coats. Women carried a small cloth draw-string bag or reticule and perhaps wore a chatelaine.

Old Style Calendar
Before 1752 the year began on Lady Day, March 25th,. Dates between January 1st and March 24th were at the end of the year. Old Style (O.S.) and New Style (N.S.) are used to indicate whether the year has been adjusted. Often both dates are used.
Children of John Kimball
& Mary Bradstreet
  • Mary Kimball Knowlton
  • Sarah Kimball Potter
  • Hannah Kimball
  • Rebecca Kimball Lull
  • Elizabeth Kimball Jewett
  • Corporal Richard Kimball
  • & Mary Bradstreet
    or Mary Jordan
  • Abigail Kimball Poole Estey
  • John Kimball
  • Benjamin Kimball
  • Moses Kimball
  • Aaron Kimball
  • Joseph Kimball
  • The New England Meetinghouse was the only municipal building in a town. Both worship and civil meetings were held there. It was customary for men and women to sit separately and the town chose a committee once a year to assign seats according to what was paid, age, and dignity.
    Early European settlers in the American colonies were mostly farmers and craftsmen. They had to work hard to provide daily neccesities for themselves.
     

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    from History and Genealogy of the Jewetts of America

    Elizabeth Jewett (Jeremiah, Jeremiah, Joseph4, Edward1), was born in Ipswich, Mass., about 1689. She married there (Pub. Jan. 28, 1709) Sergeant Thomas Day, of Ipswich.

     
    Cutter's work is available on CD
    The town of Ipswich was established on August 5, 1634, from common land called Agawam. On October 18, 1648, that portion called the "Village" at the New Meadows was set off as Topsfield. The boundary line between Ipswich and Topsfield was established, February 28, 1694.

    from Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of Boston and Eastern Massachusetts by William Richard Cutter, published by Lewis Historical Pub. Co., 1908

    Jeremiah Jewett, eldest child of Joseph and Mary (Mallinson) Jewett, was born probably in England, about 1637, and died May 20, 1714. His home was in Ipswich, near the Rowley line, and his associations were chiefly with the latter town, where he owned a farm given him by his father, also where he attended church and after his death w:as buried in the graveyard there...

    Jeremiah Jewett married Sarah, daughter of Thomas Dickinson, of Rowley; she died January 30, 1723-4. Children, all born in Ipswich, and baptized in the church in Rowley:
    1. Jeremiah, born December 30, 1662;
    2. Joseph, born April 17, 1665.
    3. Thomas, born January 29, 1667-8. died July 1, 1742. unmarried.
    4. Eleazer, baptized November 23, 1673; was in Norwich, Connecticut, in 1742, when he conveyed lands there to his son Eleazer, and was again in Rowley in December same year.
    5. Sarah, baptized November 23, 1673; married June 9, 1692. William Hobson.
    6. Mary, born January 27, 1674-5, died in Newbury (according to Coffin's Newbury) November 25. 16,95; married November 1, 1694, Abner Dale, of Newbury.
    7. Nehemiah, born about 1678; married Priscilla Bradstreet.
    8. Ephraim, born February 2, 1679-80; married Elizabeth Hammond.
    9. Caleb, born 1681.

    Jeremiah Jewett, eldest child of Jeremiah and Sarah (Dickinson) Jewett, born in Ipswich, December 30, 1662, died there February 15, 1731-2. He married first, in Ipswich or Topsfield. January 4, 1687-8, Elizabeth Kimball. who died in Ipswich, in August. 1728.

    He married second, January 21, 1729. Elizabeth Bugg of Ipswich. After his death his widow Elizabeth married second, September 5. 1732, Joseph Nelson.

    Children of Jeremiah and Elizabeth (Kimball) Jewett:
    1. Elizabeth, married (published January 28, 1709) Thomas Day, of Ipswich.
    2. Hannah, born July 16, 1690; married February 27, 1710-11, Stephen Pearson.
    3. Aaron, born February 10, 1693, died June 27, 1694.
    4.Moses, born October 13, 1695, died June 11. 1715.
    5. Aaron, born June 13. 1699; (see post ).
    6. Mary, born June 30, 1703; married first, 1727, Joseph Bennett; second, Solomon Lakeman, of Ipswich.
    7. Mercy, born February 25, 1706; married November 14, 1733. Daniel Chapman, Jr. of Ipswich.

    Boston was founded in 1630 by Puritan settlers from England.

    Estate inventories give us a glance into the home life of Colonial Americans.

     

    Bauman & Dreisbach
     
     
     

    ©Roberta Tuller 2017
    tuller.roberta@gmail.com