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An American Family History

Samuel Davis, Sr

Read about Groton.

Colonial legislatures granted land to a group of settlers (proprietors) who chose how to divide the land. They had some rights of governance.

Samuel Davis, Sr. was born in 1630 in England. He was the son of Barnabas Davis and Patience James.

He married Mary Waters on March 20, 1655/56 in Lancaster. Their children and life together are described in detail in the section on Samuel and Mary Davis.

He was one of the original proprietors of Groton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts and was granted 20 acres of land and chosen Supervisor of Highways in 1663.

Samuel's will was dated December 20, 1699 and mentioned his wife Mary, sons John, Nathaniel, and Samuel, and daughters Mary Pratt, Elizabeth Church, Patience Green, and Sarah Cade. It was witnessed by Joseph Parham, Martha Waters, and Jonas Blanard. The inventory of his estate was taken Jan. 27, 1699/1700 by Joseph Parham and James Blanchard. It was proved March 12, 1699-1700.

He died on December 28, 1699 in Groton, Middlesex County,  Massachusetts.

Old Style Calendar
Before 1752 the year began on Lady Day, March 25th,. Dates between January 1st and March 24th were at the end of the year. Old Style (O.S.) and New Style (N.S.) are used to indicate whether the year has been adjusted. Often both dates are used.
Children of
Barnabas Davis
and Patience James
  • Samuel Davis
  • Patience Davis Ridland
  • Barnabus Davis
  • Nathaniel Davis
  • Hopewell Davis
  • James Davis
  • Children of Samuel Davis Sr.
    and Mary Waters
  • Mary Davis
  • Elizabeth Davis Church
  • Mary Davis Lewis Pratt
  • John Davis
  • Sarah Davis Cady
  • Samuel Davis
  • Barnabas Davis
  • Steven Davis
  • Patience Davis Green
  • Nathaniel Davis
  • Groton, Middlesex County, Massachusetts was settled and incorporated in 1655. During King Philip's War, indigenous warriors burned all but four of Groton's garrisons. Survivors fled, but returned two years later to rebuild the town. Groton was again threated during Queen Anne's War.

    Europeans who made the voyage to America faced a difficult journey of several months.
    Middlesex County, Massachusetts was created on May 10, 1643. The county originally included Charlestown, Cambridge, Watertown, Sudbury, Concord, Woburn, Medford, Wayland, and Reading.
     

    divider

     
    European and indiginous American fought fierce battles as the Europeans expanded their territory.

    Genealogical and Family History of the State of Maine, by George Thomas Little, Henry Sweetser Burrage, Albert Roscoe Stubbs published by Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1909

    Samuel [Davis], eldest child of Barnabas and Patience Davis, was born in 1630 in England, and settled soon after his marriage in Groton, Massachusetts, where his children were born.

    He was a prominent man of his time and active in the struggles with the savage foes surrounding his home. By one authority it is stated that he was killed in Groton by the Indians in 1704; others say it was his son Samuel. His son John was slain near his home in Groton. Samuel died December 28, 1699.

    He was married in 1656 to Mary Waters, who was born January 27, 1638, a daughter of Laurence and Ann (Linton) Waters, of Watertown, Lancaster and Charlestown.

    Their children were:
    1. Elizabeth.
    2. Mary, married (first) Isaac Lewis; (second) Thomas Pratt.
    3. John, born March 10, 1664, lived in Groton, where he was killed by the Indians in October, 1704.
    4. Sarah.
    5. Samuel,
    6. Barnabas, who died 1690.
    7. Patience, wife of John Green.

    Queen Ann’s War was between 1702 and 1713. It was part of the War of Spanish Succession. England, Austria, the Netherlands, and Portugal joined forces to prevent France from becoming too powerful. The war waged on the New England frontier was called Queen Ann’s War.

    Early European settlers in the American colonies were mostly farmers and craftsmen. They had to work hard to provide daily neccesities for themselves.

     

    Bauman & Dreisbach
     
     
     

    ©Roberta Tuller 2017
    tuller.roberta@gmail.com